Free Will

Possible action
Voluntary decision
Causal connectedness

From among many various alternatives, several suggested routes of travel are promulgated. Leading to divergent outcomes, an existential attitude emphasizes such freedom of choice, as well as the obligation of having to choose, or not.

“I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.” – Umberto Eco

Uniformities

Definitely determined
According to conditions
Described nature

Leading to adaptation, future anticipation depends on comprehending uniformity. Cognitive processes trace homogeneity by designating apparently equivalent phenomena in the same classification. Similarities naturally produce purposive action.

“On the one hand they make the phenomena of the world classifiable and thereby comprehensible; and on the other hand they make possible the development of an organ of comprehension called reason.” – Paul Carus

Natural Grouping

Essential dimensions
Conditions of existence
Anatomic unity

As we know it, actuality is always slipping away. In an uncertain framework, aesthetics weaves transient circumstances into meaningful narratives.

“The contradiction is this: man rejects the world as it is, without accepting the necessity of escaping it.” – Albert Camus

Underived Anterior

Actual atmosphere
Cumulative force
Return to origins

A certain amount of aesthetic exploration helps to maintain interest in the accumulation of ordinary experience. In a curious sense, where I stand is always in an artistic laboratory, with excess energy strewing innovative designs about.

“Each is a link in an endless chain.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Cut Glass

Natural forms
Accurate reality
Provides knowledge

Refractive transparent shapes cause wavelength dispersion as light propagates through space. Forms are object essences without which a thing would not be the kind of thing that it is.

“If a person were to show that all is one by partaking of one, and at the same time many by partaking of many, would that be very astonishing. But if he were to show me that the absolute one was many, or the absolute many one, I should be truly amazed.” – Parmenides

Interaction Rhetoric

Improvise insolently
Implicit proprieties
Inventive incipit

A roadside attraction that is oblivious to its charms opens up at high speed. All things move relative to one another except the speed of light that is perhaps an absolute universal frame of reference.

“Contrary to what phenomenology–which is always phenomenology of perception–has tried to make us believe, contrary to what our desire cannot fail to be tempted into believing, the thing itself always escapes.” – Jacques Derrida

Point Dwelling

Discourse trajectory
Itinerary consequence
Deciphered destination

Even under a full moon, if the air is clear the stars appear.

“Do not complain beneath the stars about the lack of bright spots in your life.” – Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson

Weatherworn

Epoch juncture
Complex gnarl
Imagination sets in

An old door indicates passage through time as a narrative written in texture.

“I’m afraid that if you look at a thing long enough, it loses all of its meaning.” – Andy Warhol

Exists as Becoming

Irresistibly drawn
Difference insistence
Impinge relief

The local and distant interfuse in an open system under the night sky, articulated only through an absolute and ungeneralizable singularity. The immersion of life and matter in the real depends on the force and effect of duration.

“Likes won’t get you diddly in these parts.” – Thomas Middleditch

Spatial Form

Modernist assumptions
Spiritual implications
Stylistic differences

To arrive at meaningful descriptions we must move away from exactitude. Not only are all visual images abstractions, but in alliance the rigorous sciences also are fabricated upon inexact representations.

“The work of art, as an autonomous organism, stands beside nature on equal terms and, in its deepest and innermost essence, devoid of any connection with it, in so far as by nature is understood the visible surface of things.” – Wilhelm Worringer